Project Information
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Downtown Revitalization
Lupe Perez - Manager
2600 Fresno Street
Room 2156
Fresno, CA 93721
(559) 621-8371
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Overview

The Fulton Corridor Specific Plan (FCSP) and the Downtown Neighborhoods Community Plan (DNCP) together encompass several distinct center city areas including the Central Business District, the Cultural Arts District, the South Stadium zone, Chinatown as well as the surrounding Lowell, Jefferson, Southwest, and Southeast neighborhoods.  In all, the combined plan areas comprise approximately 7,000 acres.

The planning effort represents an important opportunity to revitalize the core of one of California's longstanding regional centers.  Fresno's importance began from the time of its founding in 1872, sparking a half century of growth and prosperity until World War II. This was followed by a period of downtown decline coinciding with the growth of outlying suburbs.  In response to evolving, long-term challenges, the plans seek to reinvigorate the City by creating a comprehensive vision and implementation strategies for future development.

The plans will incorporate extensive outreach and focus on revitalization, aesthetics, infrastructure, incorporation of a high speed rail station, and attraction and expansion of businesses.  It will include a Specific Plan, Community Plan, and a supporting environmental document. The effort is scheduled to be completed over the course of nearly three years.

Why are these plans important?

Current City law for development is often confusing, contradictory, and works against good projects that would contribute to property values downtown and in Fresno’s older neighborhoods.  The new Fulton Corridor Specific Plan and Downtown Neighborhoods Community Plan will remove these obstacles and replace them with new City development law that is easy to use and understand, and provides protection for investments in our Downtown area.

Specific and Community Plans are common instruments of land use law in California, and in Fresno, these Plans are a critical piece of the City’s effort to revitalize our Downtown and alleviate the concentrated poverty in surrounding neighborhoods.  Results from other downtowns and even Fresno’s own Tower District suggest that such Plans can increase property values in the areas they serve.  While greater values benefit property owners, they also have the potential to produce significant returns on the City’s investment over time through property tax revenue.